Kangaroo

Kangaroo

Gifts: Taking a leap of faith. Keeping what’s precious to you close at hand. Groundedness. Strength. Moving forward.

Challenges: Leaping before you look. Not enjoying the here and now. Holding on too tight what’s precious to you.

Kangaroo’s most obvious lesson is to take a leap of faith. Kangaroo’s leap is different from Grasshopper’s (who does not have its own section in this book) in that Kangaroo brings the gifts of balance and groundedness. Grasshopper’s leap is more airy while also unimaginably high.

Kangaroo’s large, powerful tail gives balance—limiting wavering and wobbling—during leaps. Kangaroo’s very large feet bring grounding, enough so to make the leaps even bigger. It is that strong connection to Earth that facilitates the leap, that makes it more powerful. You also see in Kangaroo’s leaps a steadiness and determination. This is not better than the airy feeling of Grasshopper’s leaps—just different. One will usually resonate more with you than the other. Though there is a time and place for each type of leap, even within your own life. As messengers, Kangaroo may show up in one situation, Grasshopper in another.    

If Kangaroo is a lifetime power animal for you, then you constantly have the grounded, balanced power of Kangaroo’s leaps. Even when you get a message to take more of a flying leap with Grasshopper, you will still have the strength and grounding of Kangaroo.

Kangaroo teaches keeping what is precious to you close at hand. For you, this precious cargo would be things such as creative ideas that still need time to incubate and gestate. If the baby kangaroo misses the pouch or comes out too soon, it will die. Much of its time spent in the pouch is spent growing through the fetal stage. Imagine what happens when you release your creative ideas into the world prematurely, before they have had a chance to take root fully within you, before they have taken full form and gained the strength to stand on their own. Most of the time, those creative ideas wither and die. Immature businesses fail. Incomplete work gets rejected. Half-baked ideas get ridiculed.    

The shadow side of this is the fear of lack, loss, or want. You may be tempted to hold onto your ideas or intellectual property longer than needed, out of fear. But you see that Kangaroo’s pouch can not be extended indefinitely to hold everything you may wish to keep safe. Kangaroo keeps only the most precious of cargo with it, and only for as long as truly needed.

Kangaroo is not suggesting that you never release your ideas into the world. No. Kangaroo is modeling that you protect them and nourish them while they complete their gestation. This is similar to Butterfly’s gift of timing. There is nothing wrong with failure, rejection, or ridicule. They can all be leaping off points on the path to success. Kangaroo suggests not risking needless failure. Incubate your “baby” until it’s fully baked. Then, like a proud parent at graduation, release it into the world.

Jaguar

Jaguar

Koala

Koala